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Therapy articles related to Stress

The Benefits of Mindfulness

The Benefits of Mindfulness

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Mindfulness has been defined as "a moment-to-moment awareness of one's experience without judgment" (1). This means having conscious awareness of one's own thoughts, feelings, sensations, and behaviors, without evaluation, or the formation of an opinion. You're acting mindfully when you listen to a song you love, and notice every tiny detail in the sound...
Taking Therapy off the Couch

Taking Therapy off the Couch

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During the winter in the Midwest United States many clients display depressive symptoms due to inactivity, lack of sunlight and body chemical shifts. As an avid jogger myself, I recognize how my own activity level impacts my mood throughout the seasons. I have taken this information and have applied it to my own therapy practice by way of walking and talking with clients...
Trauma Treatment Planning for Clinicians

Trauma Treatment Planning for Clinicians

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"I can't go on like this!" A client recently spoke these words to me when referring to symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The impact of PTSD on quality of life cannot be underestimated. My former supervisor, Victor Carrion, MD, Director of the Stanford Early Life Stress Research Program, says PTSD is a disorder of fear extinction and it feeds on avoidance...
How to Practice Mindfulness Meditation

How to Practice Mindfulness Meditation

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Jon Kabat-Zinn--a leader in the field of mindfulness and health--has defined mindfulness as "paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgementally." This means consciously paying attention to our senses, and to our feelings, without further judgement. For example, mindfulness could be practised by focusing on the sensation of water rushing over your hands as it falls from a faucet, or by feeling and accepting sadness without trying to push it away or to evaluate it...
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