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Coping Skills: Depression

When used correctly, coping skills can reduce the symptoms of depression, and improve well-being. Depending on the coping skill, they can be used during a difficult moment to quell negative thoughts, or consistently every day to gradually improve mood.

The Coping Skills: Depression worksheet describes four research-supported techniques to alleviate symptoms of depression. These techniques include behavioral activation, using social support, positive journaling, and practicing mindfulness.

We recommend practicing these techniques during session, and strategizing when they can best be used. Afterwards, create a plan for clients to practice at home. This handout serves as an excellent take-home reminder for the basics of each technique.

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References

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